Treasuries Sell-Off Raises US Debt Fears

31 Mar

From the UK’s Telegraph:

Investors are braced for a further sell-off in US Treasuries after dramatic moves last week raised fears that the surfeit of US government debt is starting to saturate bond markets.

The yield on 10-year Treasuries – the benchmark price of global capital – surged 30 basis points in just two days last week to over 3.9pc, the highest level since the Lehman crisis. Alan Greenspan, ex-head of the US Federal Reserve, said the abrupt move may be “the canary in the coal mine”, a warning to Washington that it can no longer borrow with impunity. He said there is a “huge overhang of federal debt, which we have never seen before”.

David Rosenberg at Gluskin Sheff said Treasury yields have ratcheted up 90 basis points since December in a “destabilising fashion”…

Mr Rosenberg said the yield spike recalls the move in the spring of 2007 just as the credit system started to unravel.

Looming over everything is the worry that markets will not be able to absorb the glut of US debt as the Fed winds down its policy of bond purchases, starting with an exit from mortgage-backed securities. It currently holds a quarter of the $5 trillion of the MBS market.

The rise in US bond yields has set off mayhem in the 10-year US swaps markets. Spreads turned negative last week, touching the lowest level in 20 years.

Barnaby Joyce has been warning of the dangers of sovereign debt levels – and in particular the massive US debts – since October 2009. He has been ceaselessly ridiculed by the Labor government, and the mainstream media, for daring to say so.

Please take the time to browse the dozens of articles on this blog, from all around the world, citing leading economists, financiers, traders, and commentators – some of whom predicted the first round of the GFC. Not one of our economic “authorities” did.

Barnaby Joyce is far from the only one who is questioning our economic future, due to massive (and rising) sovereign debt levels, especially in the USA, UK, and Europe.

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