5 Reasons Why Politicians Deserve Their Latest Pay Rise

14 Jun

After much painstaking research, ponderous analysis, and calm reflection, I finally worked why it is that Australian politicians (and senior public servants) deserve their latest 2.4% pay rise … and their next one too, scheduled for December 2013.

So without further ado, here are 5 compelling reasons why the PM deserves an extra $11.9k (now $507k per annum), and why dozy backbench MP’s deserve an extra $4.5k ($195k per annum):

1. Low paid workers were last week awarded a 2.6% pay rise ($821.60 per annum), taking the minimum wage to $622.20 per week ($32k per annum)

2.

3.

4.

5.

Ain’t percentages grand?

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3 Responses to “5 Reasons Why Politicians Deserve Their Latest Pay Rise”

  1. mick June 14, 2013 at 9:54 am #

    I cannot but agree. Who amongst us can take pay rises approaching 100% and then follow ups at regular intervals which leave the cpi and the rest of the population for dead? Answer: politicians and CEOs both of whom have their ‘independent remuneration tribunals’. I have argued for a long time that unions should also employ ‘independent remuneration tribunals’ and demand similar pay rises. Can you imagine the reaction of both government and employer groups? Rules for some and (different) rules for others.

  2. Tomorrows Serf June 14, 2013 at 10:39 am #

    For once, words fail me………….

    Good grief!!

    It really makes me WANT to pay my taxes, knowing that it is going to remunerate such a worthy and valuable class of parasite.(with a few exceptions)

  3. Kevin Moore June 14, 2013 at 1:00 pm #

    Is taxation voluntary or compulsory,or need we pay any tax?

    http://basic-fraud.com/

    Australian Taxation Office (ATO)
    Cannot Furnish Legal Files for its Own Creation!
    Q: Is the ATO operating legally?
    A: Going by the Australian Constitution and the following letter from the ATO,
    the answer is “No!”
    Here is an Affidavit by Anthony Wallace, an officer within the ATO, Australia.
    IN THE ADMINISTRATIVE
    APPEALS TRIBUNAL
    Tribunal Reference: N1999/1483
    In the Matter of
    Douglas Cameron
    Applicant
    AND
    COMMISSIONER OF TAXATION
    Respondent
    AFFIDAVIT
    On 25 February 2000, I, AnthonyWallace of 2 Constitution Avenue, Canberra, Commonwealth
    public servant, say on oath:
    1. I am an officer of the Australian Taxation Office (hereafter “ATO”) holding the position of
    Executive Level 1 in the Legal Policy and Coordination section.
    2. My duties in the Legal Policy and Coordination section are primarily concerned with responding
    to applications under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth.).
    3. By virtue of my duties as an officer of the ATO, I prepared the reply to Mr Douglas Cameron’s
    letter of 18 February 1999.
    4. In order to prepare the reply to Mr Cameron’s letter of 18 February 1999, I searched for and
    caused searches to be undertaken for the documents setting up the Australian Taxation Office.
    5. I searched for and caused searches to be undertaken for the said documents during the months
    of March and April 1999. I could not identify any other possible or likely repositories for the
    documents.
    The Searches Undertaken
    6. I searched the ATO’s computerised file marking system (TORT) for files referring to the creation
    of the ATO but I was unable to identify any relevant files.
    7. I conducted an extensive search of the ATO’s National Office library. I was assisted in this task
    by Karen Moore who was one of the ATO’s librarians.
    Page 2
    8. I contacted Denis Gray of the Records Management section of the ATO and asked him if he
    was aware of any files that related to the establishment of the ATO. Denis told me that he had no
    knowledge of any such files and that he was unable to identify any such files when he searched
    the section’s manual card index.
    9. I contacted Paul Southwell whom I understood at that time to be the acting Director of Policy in
    the Parliamentary Business Unit within the ATO. Paul was unaware of any executive instrument
    that set up the ATO.
    10. I contacted Jane Holden who was the Authorisations and Delegations Officer in the Office of
    the Chief Tax Counsel within the ATO. Jane was not aware of any documents creating the ATO.
    11. I contacted the secretary of the Commissioner of Taxation and asked if she had knowledge of
    any administrative file that might contain documents setting up the ATO. The secretary informed
    me that she did not have knowledge of any administrative files that contained documents setting
    up the ATO.
    12. I spoke to Jody Kisbee who was the Executive Assistant to Robyn Orr, the Acting Assistant
    Commissioner of People and Structures in the ATO. I asked Jody if she knew of any files that
    contained documents setting up the ATO. Jody replied that she did not know of any such files.
    13. I contacted Madeline Campbell of the Australian Government Solicitor. Madeline referred me to
    Dianne Callahan who was an officer in the Governor-General’s Office dealing with requests under
    the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth.)
    14. I contacted Dianne Callahan. Dianne was unaware of any documents setting up the ATO and
    referred me to Frank Leveritt of the Federal Executive Council.
    15. I contacted Frank Leveritt who referred me to Kate Banks of the Federal Executive Council. I
    contacted Kate Banks who undertook to search for documents setting up the ATO and then to
    inform me of the results of her searches. Kate later telephoned me and said that she was unable to
    find any documents setting up the ATO but referred me to the National Archives.
    16. I spoke to Caroline Connor of the National Archives. Caroline later telephoned me and said
    that she had searched for documents setting up the ATO but had been unable to find any.

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