Tag Archives: carbon tax

Incompetent Government Marionetted By Greens The Death Of Cattlemen

30 Mar

Remember the knee-jerk government action on live cattle exports?

It just gets better:

High dollar, carbon tax to hit cattlemen

Australian beef producers risk becoming globally uncompetitive, if they are not already, a forum in Darwin has heard.

The Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association (NTCA) 2012 annual general meeting and beef forum was told costs for beef producers were drifting higher and were not sustainable.

NTCA president Rohan Sullivan told about 300 cattle producers at the meeting that the cost of slaughtering cattle in southern Australia was about $340 per head, compared to just $150 per head in the United States, and $30 per head in Indonesia.

Mr Sullivan said the introduction of the carbon tax would likely add another $20 to that figure for Australian cattle farmers, and also add to export transport costs.

He said stringent food safety requirements, a skills shortage, high labour costs and the strong Australian dollar were also making beef producers less competitive than those overseas.

“We need something else, because the current situation is not sustainable,” Mr Sullivan told the meeting.

“Australia risks becoming globally uncompetitive, if it isn’t already,” he said.

Mr Sullivan said General Motors was recently promised more than $200 million over 10 years by governments to keep going in Australia, while Indonesia will be given $20 million to develop its cattle industry.

Australian cattle producers should also get assistance, he said.

“A slip lane on the Stuart Highway and supporting our infrastructure don’t seem too big an ask,” Mr Sullivan said.

He said the issue of wild dogs was also becoming a big issue for producers.

“There was a report the other day from a member of the academia to reintroduce dingoes into some areas to control foxes, cats and that are overrun with herbivores – I wonder if that includes sheep and cows?” he said.

During the past year Northern Territory cattle producers have also had to face challenges from the one-month live export ban on the sale of cattle to Indonesia, and bushfires which tore through much of Central Australia, Mr Sullivan said.

But that’s ok, right?

Who needs a healthy, thriving, locally-produced food industry?

Let’s just ban the building of dams, wipe out the cattle industry, sell off prime agricultural land for mining … and our best agri-businesses to the Americans and the Chinese.

After all, I have no doubt it will be no problem whatsoever when we Try Asking 1.3 Billion Stomachs Armed With Nukes To Give Our Food Back.

Too Little Too Late

30 Mar

[h/t for video to wakeup2thelies]

Great, isn’t it?

As we have seen in last week’s post on the too-high AUD, and again in today’s post on the mining tax, it seems that it is only after a problem is created, only after diabolical, and/or idiotic, and/or treasonous legislation is actually passed into law, that the legislation starts to receive any serious scrutiny and criticism from the “experts”. And, for that criticism to be prominently and neutrally reported by the mainstream media.

From AAP via Business Spectator:

Murray launches attack on ALP policy

The outgoing chairman of the Future Fund has launched a stinging attack on the Gillard government ahead of his departure next week.

David Murray described the carbon tax as the worst piece of economic reform he had seen in his life, warning it would be very bad for the economy.

It would raise costs within Australia and reduce the export competitiveness of energy-related commodities.

Speaking on ABC radio, he also fired a shot at the mining tax, saying it was “clumsily” designed and introduced.

“The timing at the top of the terms of trade was not good,” he said.

UPDATE:

Ummmm … hasn’t the government been tirelessly claiming that households will not be worse off under the CO2 derivatives scam, because of the “compensation” package?

The unions disagree:

Unions want wage increase to offset carbon tax

A group representing the Australian Services Union and Queensland Public Sector Union plans to factor in the cost of the carbon tax during bargaining negotiations with the Queensland government later this year, arguing the tax will raise the cost of living for their members, according to a report by The Australian.

The Together group, representing the two unions, were supporters of the carbon tax, but now say the $8 billion household compensation package would not cover the cost of the carbon tax for their workers.

“They are compensating 60 per cent of people for some of it,” Union secretary Alex Scott said, according to The Australian. “That’s far from full compensation. We want to make sure we don’t go backwards in terms of cost of living.”

The prospect of carbon tax costs factoring into union wage negotiations has sparked growing concerns among employers over fears the new tax will cause a ripple effect that will raise the cost of production and labour beyond expectations.

UPDATE 2:

From the Australian:

OUTGOING Future Fund chairman David Murray has condemned Labor’s carbon tax as “the worst piece of economic reform I have ever seen in my life”.

Mr Murray, who has also lashed the Gillard government’s mining tax, warned the tax would undermine the nation’s competitiveness and damage the economy.

“If you want me to tell you my view, it is the worst piece of economic reform I have ever seen in my life in Australia,” he told ABC radio this morning.

“The consequence of introducing that tax at that level in Australia today is very, very bad for this economy, particularly in terms of international competitiveness.

“It’s Time For Governments To Stick To Their Knitting”

29 Mar

Senator Joyce writes for the Canberra Times:

Gillard is on a suicide mission

A joke I remember well from school is that of the Japanese Wing Commander briefing his pilots before a mission in about 1945. In emphatic language he lauds the virtues of Japan, the Emperor and the war task, then orders that the pilots load their planes with bombs, fly low into the rising sun and on into the sides of US ships. The Wing Commander then asks ”any questions?”

”Only one,” comes the reply from a bandana-wearing pilot in the front row ”most honourable Wing Commander, have you gone completely crazy?”

I am waiting for some bandana-wearing Labor parliamentarian to ask the same question of Julia Gillard after she has ordered her troops to reload their planes with the carbon tax and fly it into the side of the electorate.

She has just seen the most precise example of an electoral annihilation in Queensland. The exit polling indicates that cost of living, trust and the carbon tax were issues foremost in voters’ minds. My own survey on the polling booths affirms these findings.

Predominantly voters wanted to speak to me about two things on Saturday, the carbon tax and debt.

What was the PM thinking when, after this disaster, she announces a rededication to this ludicrous cause? Anyhow, my colleagues and I will back Gillard’s stubbornness over discernment and capitalise on the Labor party’s inability to do the bleeding obvious and drop the carbon tax.

Tony Windsor claims that the Queensland election was a victory for independents; well of course Tony, how did the front pages miss that story? Only two out of five were re-elected; one sits in a safe Labor seat (Gladstone) and the other suffered a 10 per cent swing against him. On average the independents suffered an 18 per cent swing against them, even larger than the 15 per cent swing against the Labor party, but in WindsorWorld this is a job well done.

Hubris is our greatest foe. The Katter Australian Party, or its next reincarnation, will harvest a resentment vote on the aspirations of those whose lives or rights may not change enough for their vote to lock in where they last placed it. Labor will be still trying to ”get back to its core” but this will prove near impossible with Julia Gillard casting a clumsy shadow over all Labor grassroots philosophy.

The LNP has a massive task in front of it. It must start paying back debt; it has to put a broom through the areas of the bureaucracy that are not willing to go on the journey that the public vote has overwhelmingly asked for; it has to still invest in key infrastructure or the state business plan will not be able to raise the money to pay the debt.

Importantly it has to change the culture about how it sees itself and how the world sees Queensland. It has to brush the cobwebs from tourism venues that seem to be still living in the ’80s. It has to realise that the wealth, coal, cotton, cattle, grain and the troublesome coal seam gas start in the regions and the people in the regions know this.

The LNP has made a good start by scrapping more than $650 million in programs that aim to change the temperature of the globe. Trying to change the climate from a room in George Street is absurd. We may as well send Campbell Newman to South Korea this week to help the world dispose of nuclear material, and there would be more chance of success there than in changing the climate.

It is simply not the Queensland government’s core business. Every dollar spent on these woopy ”green” programs is a waste of taxpayers’ money if there is no relationship between the spend and a real outcome.

A fundamental lesson of the Queensland election for all political parties is don’t get too carried away saving the world when it is quite evident that is not the league we play in; leave that to the US, China and the 100 million population league. Instead, concentrate on roads being safe, nurses being paid on time, the public books to be kept in order and living costs to be kept under control.

It would be peculiar if Australia took the lead on regime change so it is doubly so when you try do it on climate change.

It’s time for governments to stick to their knitting.

Barnaby is right.

I particularly and enthusiastically applaud his astute observation that Australian political parties should not “get too carried away saving the world when it is quite evident that is not the league we play in; leave that to the US, China and the 100 million population league”.

Indeed.

We are a pissant little country; a big-arse island continent, with a tiny population.

A pimple on the bum of the world.

Nothing wrong with that.

Except when idiot, corrupt politicians decide to squeeze the pimple, thinking that they are “saving the planet”.

It is high time that Australian politicians – and Australians more generally, for that matter – gave our relative overachievement-in-sports-driven national hubris the big punt, and instead embraced the humility that would enable us to avoid being taken on the kind of mad “frolics” that Senator Joyce wisely resists.

Campbell Newman Does A Barry

28 Mar

Click to enlarge

NSW Election Campaign. February 24, 2011.

Barry O’Farrell:

“I don’t support a carbon tax, the Premier does,” Mr O’Farrell said.

“The premier’s advisers say carbon taxes will cost families another $500 a year on their power bills.

“I don’t think that’s affordable.

“If you’re talking about reducing the cost of living pressures you can’t support a carbon tax.

“I won’t and I’ll go to Canberra to argue that point if I’m elected premier.”

[Mr O’Farrell] called on voters to voice their anger when they vote, saying a new coalition government would “send a shiver up the spine of every federal ALP backbencher sitting in a marginal seat”.

“The coming poll is the only opportunity that families and small businesses have across NSW to try and stop this carbon tax dead,” Mr O’Farrell said on Friday.

QLD Election Campaign. February 24, 2012.

Campbell Newman:

The carbon tax is bad for Queensland. It’s bad for jobs. Frankly, if the carbon tax is introduced it will make it even harder for us to achieve our four per cent target. But that’s why I’m here today, to say that we will fight every single day, if we’re elected, as the Government of Queensland, to fight against this tax; that even if the tax is introduced, we will work with Tony Abbott and state premiers to fight the tax still.

We hope that Queenslanders will see the opportunity in this election campaign, but particularly on the 24th of March, to send a signal to Labor – who are so caught up in their own activities and their battles at the moment – send a signal to Canberra, to Labor that you don’t want the carbon tax and that’s why people have on the 24th of March an opportunity to actually send that signal to vote against a carbon tax.

Both Barry O’Farrell and Campbell Newman made clear promises during their election campaigns, to fight against the carbon tax.

Numerous constitutional experts have said that the carbon tax legislation can be challenged in the High Court, ideally by the States, under section 114 of the Constitution (amongst others).

Many NSW voters, including this blogger, have petitioned Barry O’Farrell to action this, and make good on his campaign promise. To the best of my knowledge, there has been no further response from Premier O’Farrell.

Nothing … zip … nada … has actually been done to “fight” the carbon tax, by any Liberal-National State Government (NSW, VIC, WA, and now QLD).

It appears that Premier O’Farrell is as untrustworthy as Julia Gillard.

Promise one thing before the election.

Do the opposite after the election.

Queensland’s new Premier Newman made an identical promise before the election.

Will he now “do a Barry” after the election?

* I urge Queenslanders to directly petition their local MP, and Premier Newman, informing them of Your Will that the new Queensland State Government should challenge the carbon tax in the High Court. You can use the sample petition below:

Dear [insert State MP’s Name],

I know that it is my duty to keep you informed of MY WILL on anything that comes before Parliament, or that should come before Parliament.

My communication to you concerns the [insert State name] State Government budget, and possible impacts on the budget arising from the Commonwealth’s Clean Energy Future legislation.

Constitutional barrister Bryan Pape and other legal experts are on public record indicating that the [insert State name] State government has grounds to challenge the Commonwealth government’s Clean Energy Future legislation, under section 114 of the Australian Constitution.

IT IS MY WILL that you take immediate action to cause the [insert State name] State government to challenge the constitutionality of the Commonwealth’s Clean Energy Future 2011 (ie, carbon tax) bills in the High Court.

Yours faithfully,

[signed]

[insert your full name, address, and date, as legal evidence that you are a constituent.]

Details for contacting your State government Premier and local State MP’s below:

QLD

NSW

VIC

WA

SA

TAS

NT

Qlders To Cast Carbon Tax Verdict … LNP To Do F-All To Stop Carbon Tax

23 Mar

Media Release – The Nationals, 23 March 2012:

Dear Friends,

Queenslanders to cast carbon tax verdict

Today marks 100 days until Labor’s carbon tax drives up the price of everything, costs Australian jobs and makes us less competitive internationally – and all for no environmental gain.

Fittingly, Queenslanders will have their day of reckoning against a bad Labor government tomorrow, but also cast their judgment on the carbon tax and the deceitful government Julia Gillard leads.

This Queensland election, like last year’s NSW election, shapes as a referendum on the carbon tax. People power will be on display.

Last time in the Sunshine State there was a sense that Labor cheated its way into office. That is echoed federally with the Prime Minister’s broken carbon tax promise, ‘there will be no carbon tax under the government I lead’. Words that live in infamy and ring loudly in the ears of all Australians.

Without a record to stand on, Anna Bligh and Labor’s smear campaign against Campbell Newman has been unprecedented, ugly and Queenslanders don’t like it. It may have been headline-grabbing but, ultimately, I think it has backfired badly, especially in the last week or two.

When the Crime and Misconduct Commission confirmed Mr Newman had no case to answer and Anna Bligh could not produce a shred of evidence against him, she and Labor were exposed for the fraud they were peddling. That has repulsed people.

It was straight out of Labor’s old playbook. Muckraking and throwing anything and everything in the hope something would stick. It’s gutter politics and it doesn’t work. Dragging Mr Newman’s wife and family through that muck was morally wrong and a political mistake. People accept there is argy-bargy in politics, but this was obviously baseless and crude.

Campbell Newman is to be commended for not parachuting into a safe seat but really taking the fight up to Labor in its own backyard. Ashgrove was always going to be a tough ask, needing a 7.1% swing. That takes character and Queenslanders have responded to that.

As we’ve already seen in WA, Victoria, NSW and now Queensland the tide has turned, Labor is on the nose and Julia Gillard’s judgment day with the Australian people for Labor’s lies, waste and incompetence is coming.

I look forward to the day when the LNP and the federal Coalition are working together in government for the benefit of Queenslanders and all Australians.

King [sic … dear Lord, can noone spell or copycheck anymore?!] regards,

Warren Truss
Leader of The Nationals

Fine words.

But will the Queensland LNP do anything more than just talk it up on the bankers’ CO2 derivatives scam, once they hold power from tomorrow night?

Will they act to STOP the “carbon tax”, rather than just unconvincingly promise to “repeal” it?

Will they get off their fat, lazy, well padded, shiny-suited, taxpayer-financed arses and actually challenge the Orwellian-titled Clean Energy Future legislation in the High Court, under sections 55 and (especially) 114 of the Australian Constitution, as several expert constitutional lawyers have advised that they can?

Or … will they demonstrate themselves to be no better than their tough talking, big pre-election promising, non-delivering invertebrate counterpart in NSW, Premier Barry O’Farrell?

On past and present form, I am betting on the latter.

All talk. No action.

Queenslanders … keep the bastards honest.

Vote 1 Katter’s Australian Party (“The Australian Party” on your ballot)

“They Are Pathological In Their Hate Of It”: Barnaby

22 Mar

Barnaby Joyce on fire in the Senate.

Enjoy:

The Simple Way To Tell That The Mining Tax And Carbon Tax Are Unconstitutional

22 Mar

“By their words you shall know them.”

What is the biggest red flag alerting you to the likelihood that a government bill is unconstitutional?

When the wording of a government bill repeatedly insists that it is in compliance with a section of the Constitution.

Or, when the bill repeatedly insists that it does not do something, or is not something, that would constitute a breach of the Constitution.

Because if it were in keeping with the Constitution, then there would be no need whatsoever to say anything.

This is not just the rational surmising of your humble blogger.

A constitutional law expert agrees.

From Yahoo!7 News (emphasis added):

Government facing mining tax revolt

… [Macquarie University’s] Dr [Margaret] Kelly not only thinks Fortescue will get a hearing but that it has a decent shot at winning the case.

“Given the shortness of the Act, the lack of definitions in the Act, and the very general nature of the Act, then I, if I were the Commonwealth, wouldn’t be as hopeful as apparently the Prime Minister currently is,” she said.

She says challenges made under section 114 of the Constitution would attract serious consideration by the High Court.

The fact that each of these acts purports to say the Act does not impose a tax on the property of the states, I think, quite clearly raises that question unambiguously.

“The acts in their various forms also raise the question of, is this really a tax as opposed to being, as I say, a pecuniary penalty or some kind of fee?

“That too is a constitutional question.”

Dr Kelly is right.

In the 425 page (!?!) Explanatory Memorandum to the 288 page Minerals Resource Rent Tax Bill 2011, we find the following (emphasis added):

Imposing the MRRT

3.31    The MRRT is imposed by three different imposition Bills. One imposes MRRT to the extent that it is a duty of customs [section 3, MRRT customs imposition Bill]; one imposes MRRT to the extent that it is a duty of excise [section 3, MRRT excise imposition Bill]; and one imposes MRRT to the extent that it is neither a duty of customs nor one of excise [section 3, MRRT general imposition Bill]. This reflects the constitutional requirement that laws imposing duties of customs shall deal only with duties of customs and that laws imposing duties of excise shall deal only with duties of excise (see section 55 of the Constitution). However, there is only one assessment Act.

“This reflects the constitutional requirement” does it?  Utter bollocks!  What it “reflects”, is Australian governments’ now standard method of circumventing the clear wording and plainly obvious intent of the authors of the Constitution. I for one have no doubt whatsoever that when the authors of our Constitution wrote section 55, they certainly did NOT do so with the intent that every new tax, customs duty, or excise duty, should require the separate drafting and passage through both houses of Parliament of multiple, interdependent but at the same time, mutually-contradictory bills defining the new impost as being (1) not a tax, (2) a duty of customs, (3) a duty of excise, and (4) neither a duty of customs nor a duty of excise. To suggest otherwise is risible, and would be to assume that the authors of the Constitution wanted to make it as complicated and difficult as possible for government to impose genuine taxes, customs duties, and excise duties. No dear reader – the true reason why Australian governments (both “sides”) use this multiple interdependent but mutually-contradictory bills technique, is plainly obvious: their new imposts are not taxes, customs duties, or excise duties. They are unconstitutional money grabs … and they know it.

3.33    MRRT is not imposed on property belonging to a State. That ensures that the MRRT complies with section 114 of the Constitution, which prohibits the Commonwealth from imposing a tax on any kind of property of a State. In practice, this will only have an effect to the extent that a State mines its own taxable resources. In that case, the State will not be subject to MRRT.

Sorry BrownGilSwan.

Sorry Big Three multinational mining oligopoly PM-removers and tax-dodge designers.

Your saying so, does not make it so.

Indeed, the opposite is true.

Your saying so, almost certainly makes it not so.

Previously, we have seen exactly the same blatant Constitution-sidestepping ruse used in the 19 different bills and 1,000+ pages of the Clean Energy Future 2011 legislation:

Charge payable

(10) If a carbon unit is issued to a person in accordance with this section, the person is liable to pay a charge for the issue of the unit.

(11) Subsection (10) has effect only so far as it is not a law imposing taxation within the meaning of section 55 of the Constitution.

Note: See also:
(a) Part 2 of the Clean Energy (Charges—Excise) Act 2011; and
(b) the Clean Energy (Unit Issue Charge—General) Act 2011.

Compare …

Clean Energy (Charges – Excise) Act 2011

A Bill for an Act to impose charges associated with the Clean Energy Act 2011, so far as those charges are duties of excise

And compare …

Clean Energy (Unit Issue Charge – General) Act 2011

A Bill for an Act to impose charges associated with the Clean Energy Act 2011, so far as those charges are not duties of excise

The government’s bills for the mining tax, and the carbon tax, are not unlike a spoilt domineering child trying to get its own way.

Fingers inserted in ears.

Eyes screwed tightly shut.

And insisting, “It IS it IS it IS it IS it IS!”

Or, “It’s NOT it’s NOT it’s NOT it’s NOT it’s NOT!”

Basic rule of life, dear reader.

Listen very, very carefully to a government’s words.

Then ask yourself, “What is the opposite of what they have said?”

The opposite, is far more likely to be the truth.

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