Tag Archives: Eurozone

BBC Left Speechless: “In Less Than 12 Months The Savings Of Millions Of People Will Vanish … And Goldman Sachs Rules The World”

28 Sep

Presenter: “Jaws have collectively dropped at what you have just said.”

Stunning.

The simple, honest truth is told, by an independent trader, on BBC News.

So stunning is this, it was even shown last night on Australia’s mainstream news (Channel 10).

“This economic crisis is like a cancer .. if you just wait and wait thinking this is going to go away, just like a cancer it is going to grow and it’s going to be too late. What I would say to everybody is, get prepared. This is not a time right now to, wishful thinking that the government’s going to sort things out; the governments don’t rule the world … Goldman Sachs rules the world.”

Please share with everyone you know.

Such matter-of-fact truth-telling about markets, finance, and banksters, on mainstream TV … is truly historic.

One would expect that independent trader Alessio Rastani will never get a mainstream TV interview again (h/t ZeroHedge):

Advertisements

“There’s An Unholy Alliance Of Politicians And Bankers Versus Ordinary People”

28 Jun

Oh for independent politicians like Nigel Farage here in Australia:

One could almost be forgiven for thinking that Mr Farage was talking about Australian politicians like Malcolm Turnbull being in bed with banksters like Goldman Sachs, in seeking to impose a CO2 trading scam  – deceitfully relabelled as a “carbon tax – on our little nation.

Or, that he was talking about the recent Open Letter written by 13 “eminent” economists in support of our Green-Labor-“Independent” Alliance’s plan for “pricing carbon” – at least 77% of whom are directly employed by or connected with the bankstering sector.

What Happens When Greece Defaults?

24 May

Andrew Lilico, an economist with Europe Economics and a member of the Shadow Monetary Policy Committee in the UK, outlines the coming domino effect.

From The Telegraph UK ‘Finance’:

It is when, not if. Financial markets merely aren’t sure whether it’ll be tomorrow, a month’s time, a year’s time, or two years’ time (it won’t be longer than that). Given that the ECB has played the “final card” it employed to force a bailout upon the Irish – threatening to bankrupt the country’s banking sector – presumably we will now see either another Greek bailout or default within days.

What happens when Greece defaults. Here are a few things:

– Every bank in Greece will instantly go insolvent.

– The Greek government will nationalise every bank in Greece.

– The Greek government will forbid withdrawals from Greek banks.

– To prevent Greek depositors from rioting on the streets, Argentina-2002-style (when the Argentinian president had to flee by helicopter from the roof of the presidential palace to evade a mob of such depositors), the Greek government will declare a curfew, perhaps even general martial law.

– Greece will redenominate all its debts into “New Drachmas” or whatever it calls the new currency (this is a classic ploy of countries defaulting)

– The New Drachma will devalue by some 30-70 per cent (probably around 50 per cent, though perhaps more), effectively defaulting 0n 50 per cent or more of all Greek euro-denominated debts.

– The Irish will, within a few days, walk away from the debts of its banking system.

– The Portuguese government will wait to see whether there is chaos in Greece before deciding whether to default in turn.

– A number of French and German banks will make sufficient losses that they no longer meet regulatory capital adequacy requirements.

– The European Central Bank will become insolvent, given its very high exposure to Greek government debt, and to Greek banking sector and Irish banking sector debt.

– The French and German governments will meet to decide whether (a) to recapitalise the ECB, or (b) to allow the ECB to print money to restore its solvency. (Because the ECB has relatively little foreign currency-denominated exposure, it could in principle print its way out, but this is forbidden by its founding charter.  On the other hand, the EU Treaty explicitly, and in terms, forbids the form of bailouts used for Greece, Portugal and Ireland, but a little thing like their being blatantly illegal hasn’t prevented that from happening, so it’s not intrinsically obvious that its being illegal for the ECB to print its way out will prove much of a hurdle.)

– They will recapitalise, and recapitalise their own banks, but declare an end to all bailouts.

– There will be carnage in the market for Spanish banking sector bonds, as bondholders anticipate imposed debt-equity swaps.

– This assumption will prove justified, as the Spaniards choose to over-ride the structure of current bond contracts in the Spanish banking sector, recapitalising a number of banks via debt-equity swaps.

– Bondholders will take the Spanish Banking Sector to the European Court of Human Rights (and probably other courts, also), claiming violations of property rights. These cases won’t be heard for years. By the time they are finally heard, no-one will care.

– Attention will turn to the British banks. Then we shall see…

Deutsche Bank Agrees – Barnaby Was Right

24 Apr

Will Goose, Henry, Stevens, and Co. now step up and apologise to Barnaby for mocking his warning about US debt levels?

US finances are in almost as troubled a state as the worst-hit members of the euro zone, economists say, underscoring the pressing need for Washington to reach agreement on how to reduce the deficit.

A gauge of “sovereign risk” from economists at Deutsche Bank placed the United States just behind Greece, Ireland and Portugal among 14 advanced economies.

Gottliebsen: In The Eye Of GFC Storm

30 Jun

Highly respected business commentator Robert Gottliebsen appears to agree today with what Barnaby Joyce has been saying since October last year – that the GFC is far from over.

From Business Spectator:

Despite a late US Dow index rally, last night was among the more serious sharemarket falls we have experienced since global financial crisis plunged markets in 2009.

We are well above the dismally low levels witnessed on equities markets during the crisis, but last night you could see fear in almost every corner of the world. The forces that are behind each of the fears are probably manageable, but when they occur together, as what happened last night, they triggered waves of selling, including a savaging of the Australian dollar.

And of course Gillard’s mining tax dithering is rekindling global doubts about the sovereign risk of this country which threatens to put Australia and our high house prices in the eye of the storm.

And for most Australians, the global wave of selling will be reflected in our share prices levels at June 30, which means that the value of superannuation funds will be hit on balance day. Many retirees will have their income reduced for the year ahead…

Clearly China is slowing much more rapidly than expected, and as a result the bad property loans that are in its banking portfolios will weigh down future growth.

In the past China has always managed these issues and I think it will do it again, but the markets fear there will be much more pain than had been anticipated.

Meanwhile, in Europe the big banks have been playing the stupid game of borrowing from depositors and then investing in the sovereign debts of European countries that can’t pay.

Tomorrow the banks are supposed to repay €442 billion in emergency loans but they almost certainly will have to be bailed out again. Fears of bank collapses are rife. On top of this dire outlook, Europe’s austerity measures will bring on recessions in countries ranging from Greece to the UK which will make it even harder for the banks. And the strikes in Greece will be repeated in many countries, which could make the spending cuts impossible to deliver.

In the US they are helped because in a crisis money flows to the world currency, so the US dollar rises. Nevertheless, there are still chronic housing problems so consumer confidence is depressed and the US economy is still living on the old stimulus packages. Accordingly Wall Street’s earnings estimates look too optimistic.

Barnaby is right.

Complete And Definitive Guide To The Sovereign Debt Crisis

30 Jun

Professor Niall Ferguson, of the acclaimed book and ABC documentary series The Ascent of Money, has recently published a brilliant guide to the global sovereign debt crisis.  Click here to read it.

Back in February, Professor Ferguson had this to say in the Financial Times:

… it would be a grave mistake to assume that the sovereign debt crisis that is unfolding will remain confined to the weaker eurozone economies. For this is more than just a Mediterranean problem with a farmyard acronym. It is a fiscal crisis of the western world. Its ramifications are far more profound than most investors currently appreciate…

Europe Faces Gravest Challenge Since WWII

17 May

From AAP (via The Australian):

Warnings that Europe faces its gravest challenge since World War II and that the “contagion” from troubled states such as Greece could quickly spread have heightened anxiety in global markets after a steep plunge on Friday reversed much of the week’s gains.

The optimism that followed last week’s E750 billion ($1.05 trillion) European bailout evaporated late on Friday, with markets across the continent plunging and Wall Street closing sharply lower.

The euro tripped to its lowest level against the US dollar in 18 months on Friday on fears of years of weak economic growth in the 16-nation European bloc. The euro is at a record low against the Australian dollar, buying just $1.3974, down from more than $2 early last year.

The euro was not helped by comments by US President Barack Obama’s top economic adviser Paul Volcker, who spoke on Friday of the potential “disintegration” of the 16 nations that share the euro currency. And Paris has had to deny reports that President Nicolas Sarkozy threatened to pull France out of the euro to force German Chancellor Angela Merkel to bail out Greece.

European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Trichet at the weekend called for more action by euro-zone governments to improve fiscal governance.

“We are now experiencing extreme tensions,” he said in an interview with Germany’s Der Spiegel magazine. “In the market, there is always a danger of contagion — like the contagion we saw among the private institutions in 2008.”

And from Business Spectator:

Yesterday, Angela Merkel, German chancellor, warned that the $1 trillion rescue package had only bought Europe time, and that further steps were needed to address the differences in competitiveness and budget deficits between the member countries.

In a speech to the annual German trade union conference, Merkel emphasised that speculation against the euro was only possible because of the huge differences in economic strength and the levels of debt between individual eurozone members.

Meanwhile, the head of the European Central Bank, Jean-Claude Trichet, emphasised that it was urgent that eurozone countries rectify their budget deficits.

In an interview with the German magazine, Der Spiegel, Trichet said that the world was now facing “the most difficult situation since the Second World War – perhaps even since the First World War. We have experienced – and are experiencing – truly dramatic times.”

He said that after the events of 2007-8, “private institutions and markets were about to collapse completely”. That triggered governments to step in with very bold and comprehensive financial support.

The problem was that markets were now questioning whether some governments could afford to repay their debts.

Click here for 9 simple charts that show why a collapse of the Eurozone is inevitable.

%d bloggers like this: